Rescuing the salmon with coconut bones

Not all of my recipes turn out. Also, since I am easily distracted and usually am cooking many things at once, I often burn things. I’m trying to be better about setting a timer, but sometimes even that steers me wrong. Take last Friday. I was following the instructions on the George Foreman Grill for medium rare salmon, but it came out well-done. (Note to self – check the salmon after 2 minutes next time)
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I couldn’t bear the thought of throwing away a pound of wild sockeye salmon, so I searched for Paleo recipes for salmon cakes. I decided on this recipe from Everyday Paleo because it was supposed to be “the best salmon cakes ever!”. I was also impressed with all the positive comments the recipe received. I made some mods based on the comments.

Salmon Cakes

1 pound wild caught Alaskan Salmon
3 eggs
1/4 C shredded coconut
1 tsp granulated onion
1 tbsp dried dill
1/2 tbsp fresh ginger, minced
a few shakes of red pepper flakes
about 1 tsp fresh ground pepper
a pinch of sea salt
1/4 cup coconut oil

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Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat and add coconut oil. Peel the skin off the salmon, then flake into small pieces with a fork. It should look like the above picture when you’re done.

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Lightly beat the eggs in a bowl, then add the seasonings to the eggs and beat again. Tom was my sous chef.

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Dump the mixture on the salmon…

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…and mix well.

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Form the mixture into 8 patties. Fry for 3 straight minutes (no peaking)

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Then flip over and fry for 3 minutes on the other side.

Homemade Ginger Mayonnaise
2 eggs
2 tbsps apple cider vinegar
1 tsp yellow mustard
1 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp white pepper
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp ground ginger
1 cup extra-virgin oil
1 cup macadamia nut oil

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Place all ingrediants except for the oil into a food processor. Cover and mix while you count to 5.

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Continue to mix while you slowly add the oil. See me pouring it in slooooooowly. If you pour it in too quickly it won’t magically turn into mayonnaise. Once all the oil is in, continue to blend while you again count to 5. .

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It should be mayonnaise now. This looked and tasted like mayonnaise, only more flavorful – so much better than commercial brands full of unhealthy polyunsaturated fats!

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This made a very large jar. If I had been paying better attention, I would have cut the recipe in half.

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Lunch is served! This was another fine-dining quality meal that required very little effort. I also was pleased to turn a flop into something fantastic. These had much better flavor than salmon flakes made with crackers or breadcrumbs. The mayonnaise was the perfect topping. I was surprised how easy it was to make! I don’t know why I never tried that before! Jewel was excited to try the salmon cakes, but then I noticed her rather gingerly picking at them.
Jewel: “Do yours have bones in them?”
Me: “No, I haven’t found any.”
Jewel: “Well, mine are just full of bones!”
Me: “Jewel, that’s coconut.”
This of course resulted in peals of Jewel’s tickled-with-herself laughter, and now in our family we refer to shredded coconut as bones.

4 Responses to Rescuing the salmon with coconut bones

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